Learjet 23

The Learjet 23 is an American six to eight seat (two crew and four to six passengers) twin-engined, high speed business jet. Manufactured by Learjet, the LJ23 was revolutionary in the aviation world.

Learjet 23

Learjet 23

History

The Model 23 has its roots in a proposed fighter aircraft for Switzerland known as the FFA P-16, designed by Hans-Luzius Studer. Although the fighter was not built, William (Bill) Powell Lear, Sr. recognized the design’s potential and established Swiss American Aviation Corporation (SAAC) to produce the aircraft as the SAAC Lear Jet 23. The company was moved to Wichita, Kansas where production was started on the first Model 23 on February 7, 1962. The first flight of the Learjet 23 took place on October 7, 1963, and on October 13, 1964, the first production aircraft was delivered.

With this jet a completely new market for fast and efficient business aircraft was opened. The LJ23 is considered as a model for a whole set of similar aeroplanes which remain in production.

Production of the Learjet 23 stopped in 1966 after a total of 104 had been built. In 1998 there were still 39 LJ23s in use. A total of 27 LJ23s have been lost or damaged beyond repair through accidents during the aircraft’s lengthy career, the most recent in 2008.

Specifications

General characteristics

  • Crew: Two pilots
  • Capacity: 6 passengers
  • Length: 43 ft 3 in (13.18 m)
  • Wingspan: 35 ft 7 in (10.84 m)
  • Height: 12 ft 7 in (3.84 m)
  • Wing area: 231.1 ft² (21.48 m²)
  • Empty weight: 6,150 lb (2,790 kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 12,499 lb (5,670 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × General Electric CJ610-4 turbojets, 2,850 lbf (12.71 kN) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 561 mph (488 knots, 903 km/h, Mach 0.82) at 24,000 ft (7,300 m)
  • Cruise speed: 518 mph (450 knots, 834 km/h) at 40,000 ft (12,200 m)
  • Stall speed: 104 mph (90 knots, 168 km/h) (wheels and flaps down)
  • Range: 1,830 mi (1,591 nmi, 2,945 km) (max fuel at 485 mph (780 km/h) and 40,000 ft (12,200 m)
  • Service ceiling: 45,000 ft (13,715 m)
  • Rate of climb: 6,900 ft/min (35 m/s)
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